BLOG

Incoherent ramblings, devlogs, edgy philosophy and other topics of interest


[#100] [Tue, 20 Oct 2020 12:03:59 CST][misc]
■ Trans-dimensional shadows

Carl Jung proposed a rather novel theory to explain the mystery behind the seemingly autonomous behavior of complex lifeforms, where all members of the same species share a cognitive link among their own kin through a metaphysical entity he termed the "collective unconscious". A universal and impersonal element of our being that is inherited and beyond our control, acting as an abstract mediator between our ancestor's experiences and our immediate psyche, a repository of our predecessor's ideas that manifests itself through cryptic means, like creative thoughts and dreams.

Needless to say, such a model lies beyond the scope of our current understanding of the nature of reality and well withing the realm of the metaphysical, it even shares many similarities with Plato's "Realm of Ideas". A similar concept that attributes our perceived reality as a projection of a higher dimensional plane from which all ideas originate. The resulting universe is, therefore, an imperfect projection of a perfect idea, host to incomplete shadows or "forms" that are but abstractions of a core, fundamental concept. Thus, complex life can be understood as an incomplete permutation of a greater, encompassing idea that keeps an unconscious, bidirectional connection with its own projection.

crows exhibit (very) intelligent behavior on top of their instinctual, archetypical impulses

Who we are lies betwixt our cognitive genetic legacy and the arbiter of our own original actions we define as free will. The metaphorical blank check that new consciousnesses is popularly compared to is, therefore, inaccurate in that it fails to account for the inherited psychological defaults, the archetype that, from that point on, will wrestle with the conscious self into a predestined path of sorts. A Hegelian dialectic of the experiences we assimilate as unique individuals and the accumulated lives of our species.